All the natural movements of the soul are controlled by laws analogous to those of physical gravity.  Grace is the only exception. 

-Simone Weil, French mystic and social activist (1909-1943)

 

I was surfing the blogosphere recently and ran across the above quote, to which an unnamed blogger commented—He whose will is his Father’s, whose company is his betrayer, whose victory is his forsakenness, whose love is his suffering, is free; the exception which destroys the rule

There is no one in the entire Old Testament who got a rawer deal than Joseph.   Job lost everything, Hosea had a prostitute wife named Gomer to deal with, and prophets were killed for speaking the word of the Lord—but Joseph lived in exile year after year for merely having a dream and being foolish enough to share that dream with his own brothers (the very brothers who sold him for twenty shekels of silver and staged a phony murder to fool their father).  Fortunes turn however, and the brothers faced a famine and a brother in turn who now had their futures in his hands—a brother they thought was long gone.  

18 His brothers also came and fell down before him and said, ‘Behold, we are your servants.’ 19 But Joseph said to them, ‘Do not fear, for am I in the place of God? 20 As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today. 21 So do not fear; I will provide for you and your little ones.’ Thus he comforted them and spoke kindly to them.   (Genesis 50:18-21, ESV)

It is said that Joseph was a type of Christ, a foreshadow if you will—no scripture bears witness more.

As each of us play the betrayer at one point in our lives or another—sooner or later we become the betrayed.  Living a life of grace means giving grace to the most undeserving.  Essentially, it is handing the very instrument intended to wipe us out to the one who would do the deed.  Eventually we all face our accuser—we all stand before our enemy—empty handed, with one of two choices: To strangle the scoundrel with our own two hands, or to reach out and embrace him.    

Jesus calls us to extend grace.  Even to our betrayer.  To withhold grace from the most underserving is to most assuredly be—ungraceful.

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